The Change of Wall Street by Paul Mampilly

The early 2000s, along with the bang it gave financial markets, made Paul Mampilly into a legend. You can never expect what will happen each year, but we know that accidents aren’t how champions beat the market. The stunning record of Paul, his sustained success and his young age brought him to retirement.

He now shares his free time with subscribers holding his financial newsletter. The $50 million he transformed into $88 million, for Templeton Foundation in 2000, professes the status he works with today. He had humble beginnings though. Paul Mampilly comes from an Indian family. It was in America that he, with the help of financial news and teachers, saw the potentials of U.S. culture. Paul now turns a successful investors into seasoned professionals as a side gig. They mirror him via a special publication you also have access to. It’s called Profits Unlimited.

Looking Back on a Wall Street no Longer There

An emerging message from Paul is how Wall Street fades away. The demand for investing, stocks and financial markets continue. What’s absent is the rush and hustle; the trading floor is no longer there. Paul Mampilly suggests that no one needs to be on Wall Street to make trades. They have computers for that, for technology took over. Trading from home is convenient. The result is a quiet trading floor, which Paul never thought he would see. This market works the same but from the likes of monitors. Its Paul Mampilly that brings these changes to mind.

Emerging ICOs Over IPOs

Initial Public Offerings (IPOs) introduce companies into the stock trade. The shares of a company have to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) first. They can then be traded publicly—or legally for that matter. What emerges for investors today is an alternative. That option is the Initial Coin Offering (ICO). What once used millions to billions in fees is now done with hundreds of thousands. Paul Mampilly leaves us with the financial world: more investors enter finances. These are average people with small budgets that can afford public offerings.