Human Rights Advocate – James Larkin

He is Irish labor activist, James Larkin established The Transport and General Worker’s Union. On January 28, 1874, the human rights and worker’s advocate was born in Liverpool, England. Larkin came from a very humble background as he and his parents lived in Liverpool slums.

James was not lucky as other children who had a formal education; instead, he had very little training, because most of the time he had to work to supplement his family income. Larkin was very hardworking, and his manual jobs landed him a position of a foreman at Liverpool docks. Read more: James Larkin | Biography and James Larkin – Wikipedia

During his service at the dock, James Larkin saw how workers were, and he wanted to fight for the rights of his fellow workers a move that led him to join the National Union of Dock Laborers (NDUL). In 1905 Larkin became fully involved in trade unions as well as a trade organizer.

He was a fighter of the worker’s rights, and his methods of fighting were not allowed in the National Union of Dock Laborers, and he had to be transferred to Dublin where he established the Irish Transport and General Worker’s Union.

James Larkin had one purpose when creating the union; to bring all Irish workers both skilled and unskilled together. As if the Transport and General Worker’s Union was not enough to advocate for worker’s rights, Larkin created the Irish Labor Party and he used the party to organize a series of strikes in the country.

In 1913 Larkin through his Irish Labor Party organized what is known to be the most extended strike in the country. During the Dublin Lockout more than 100000 went on strike for more than eight months, and eventually, the workers won their rights for fair employment.

After the Dublin Lockout, the Transport and General Worker’s Union collapsed, and Mr. Larkin moved to the United States of America to raise money to fight the British.

Three years after traveling to the United States, Larkin was accused of communism as well as criminal acts, and he was deported back to his home country. In 1903 he married Elizabeth Brown, and they were blessed with four children. Larkin died in 1947 and was buried in Dublin, Ireland.